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Stressed workers more likely to blame physical illnesses for absence

Stress has become the top health and safety concern in the workplace and stressed workers don’t talk about it, a new study finds.

A quarter of  stressed workers have taken time off but blame it on physical illness instead, a report by Aviva finds.

The report looks into the causes for employee absences in time for National Stress Awareness Day.

Stress has become the top health and safety concern in the workplace and National Stress Awareness Day aims to tackle the problems stressed workers face at work.

In 2014/15, 23.3 million days were lost due to work-related ill health. While some workplace stress is normal, excessive stress can interfere with your productivity and performance—and impact your physical and emotional health.

Lisa Gillespie – director of HR Services at Moorepay, thinks that, while stress is an abstract term without a specific medical definition, it can have a substantial impact on staff wellbeing and an organisation’s performance – both in a positive and negative sense.

She says, ‘Positive stress can motivate employees to stretch themselves and reach goals they previously thought unattainable. Negative stress, on the other hand, can have very serious consequences on employees’ health and their productivity.

‘Employers will find themselves treading a fine line if they want to identify whether external unknown stress factors are affecting an employee. Or, indeed, if work-related worries are leaving a worker feeling overwhelmed.’

Gillespie thinks that companies should build up the stress resilience of by detecting and countering stressful situations before they arise.

Read More @ smallbusiness.co.uk

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